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Creativity Explored, the premier non profit visual art gallery and studio for artists with developmental disabilities, is pleased to announce the opening of Dance Party!, a group exhibition that captures the vibrant spirit and unique visual culture surrounding dance as a social activity. In this lively exhibition curated by Creativity Explored Visual Arts Instructors Leeza Doreian and Mara Poliak, a selection of artists visually interpret dance as a communal experience everywhere it takes place (on television, in movies, on YouTube, and even in the Creativity Explored art studio).

The impetus for this exhibition is Dance Fridays, which takes place at our main studio in the Mission District of San Francisco. Dance Fridays are a time where Creativity Explored artists and staff come together for a dance party every Friday afternoon. Curators Poliak and Doreian were inspired by the power dance has for participants to connect and communicate with one another through physical expression. The curator’s interest evolved further than the physical act of dancing to encompass dance spaces, dance clothing and costumes, ephemera, and ritual and community dance.

Artists considered all aspects of dance including its pop cultural aspects. In Untitled, 2015, ink and watercolor on paper, 10.25 x 18 inches, Ethel Revita morphs a disco ball in her signature style. Carefully composed blocks of solid saturated colors play off of each other creating a vibrating and musical effect. Ian Adams’ artwork Untitled (Lights), 2015, gouache on paper, 18 x 22 inches, depicts the colored lights often present at a dance party. In focusing on the lights, Adams portrays how the mood and feel of a dance party is often set by the surrounding décor, and in particular the lights.

Kate Thompson explores the social aspect of dance. Thompson is known for her intricate line drawings that convey elaborate narratives and intriguing scenes of daily life. In Lion Tamer Dance Party, 2015, marker on paper, 22 x 30 inches, Thompson draws cavemen dancing with lions. While the facial expression on each caveman is expressionless, the lion’s faces show various states of amusement, joy, or terror illustrating the emotions involved in dance. Thompson’s artwork has been exhibited internationally and was featured in West Coasts, at the Museum of La Creation Franche, in Begles, France in 2014.

Joseph “JD” Green investigates how music is discovered and consumed. Green’s series of four mixed media on wood panel artworks depict stills from Oakland based hip-hop, funk, punk group, The Coup’s music videos. In Boots Riley in "The Guillotine," 2015, 13.75 x 15.5 inches, Green draws a still from the music video, “The Guillotine” framed within an old-fashioned television set. In referencing the outdated act of watching music video’s on television opens up a dialogue on how music video’s today is primarily watched via on demand music-streaming, YouTube videos, and iTunes downloads. Also, Green’s artwork was selected to adorn a CB2 pillow in 2015.

The video component of the exhibition includes three documentations of performance by Yolanda Ramirez. Ramirez typically does not participate in Dance Fridays but when a song playing in the Creativity Explored studio moves her, she will jump up from her seat to perform an impromptu dance. For this exhibition, Ramirez’s beautiful and unique dance moves are captured on stage by Doreian and Poliak at the Roxy Theater in the Mission. In one video, Ramirez selected a contemporary Tango song by Otros Aires. In the video, Ramirez’s energetic movements coincide with the fast and upbeat rhythm of the song. Her costume is subtle, yet she is wearing a pompom bracelet she made herself. Through the film, Ramirez shakes the pompom to up-tempo beat. Another video in contrast is very demure and subtle. Ramirez selected Nina Simone’s version of the classic song, I Put a Spell On You. Opting this time for a black and white scarf as her only adornment, Ramirez movements are clearly more somber and slow, yet passionate. The juxtaposition of the different films portray the different ways in which dance is used to express, explore, and understand human emotions.

In Dance Party!, Creativity Explored artists visually communicate their experiences and personal connections to all aspects of dance. Don’t miss a beat and be sure to see this exhibition of over 30 paintings, drawings, video, and installation art.
Creativity Explored, the premier non profit visual art gallery and studio for artists with developmental disabilities, is pleased to announce the opening of Dance Party!, a group exhibition that captures the vibrant spirit and unique visual culture surrounding dance as a social activity. In this lively exhibition curated by Creativity Explored Visual Arts Instructors Leeza Doreian and Mara Poliak, a selection of artists visually interpret dance as a communal experience everywhere it takes place (on television, in movies, on YouTube, and even in the Creativity Explored art studio).

The impetus for this exhibition is Dance Fridays, which takes place at our main studio in the Mission District of San Francisco. Dance Fridays are a time where Creativity Explored artists and staff come together for a dance party every Friday afternoon. Curators Poliak and Doreian were inspired by the power dance has for participants to connect and communicate with one another through physical expression. The curator’s interest evolved further than the physical act of dancing to encompass dance spaces, dance clothing and costumes, ephemera, and ritual and community dance.

Artists considered all aspects of dance including its pop cultural aspects. In Untitled, 2015, ink and watercolor on paper, 10.25 x 18 inches, Ethel Revita morphs a disco ball in her signature style. Carefully composed blocks of solid saturated colors play off of each other creating a vibrating and musical effect. Ian Adams’ artwork Untitled (Lights), 2015, gouache on paper, 18 x 22 inches, depicts the colored lights often present at a dance party. In focusing on the lights, Adams portrays how the mood and feel of a dance party is often set by the surrounding décor, and in particular the lights.

Kate Thompson explores the social aspect of dance. Thompson is known for her intricate line drawings that convey elaborate narratives and intriguing scenes of daily life. In Lion Tamer Dance Party, 2015, marker on paper, 22 x 30 inches, Thompson draws cavemen dancing with lions. While the facial expression on each caveman is expressionless, the lion’s faces show various states of amusement, joy, or terror illustrating the emotions involved in dance. Thompson’s artwork has been exhibited internationally and was featured in West Coasts, at the Museum of La Creation Franche, in Begles, France in 2014.

Joseph “JD” Green investigates how music is discovered and consumed. Green’s series of four mixed media on wood panel artworks depict stills from Oakland based hip-hop, funk, punk group, The Coup’s music videos. In Boots Riley in "The Guillotine," 2015, 13.75 x 15.5 inches, Green draws a still from the music video, “The Guillotine” framed within an old-fashioned television set. In referencing the outdated act of watching music video’s on television opens up a dialogue on how music video’s today is primarily watched via on demand music-streaming, YouTube videos, and iTunes downloads. Also, Green’s artwork was selected to adorn a CB2 pillow in 2015.

The video component of the exhibition includes three documentations of performance by Yolanda Ramirez. Ramirez typically does not participate in Dance Fridays but when a song playing in the Creativity Explored studio moves her, she will jump up from her seat to perform an impromptu dance. For this exhibition, Ramirez’s beautiful and unique dance moves are captured on stage by Doreian and Poliak at the Roxy Theater in the Mission. In one video, Ramirez selected a contemporary Tango song by Otros Aires. In the video, Ramirez’s energetic movements coincide with the fast and upbeat rhythm of the song. Her costume is subtle, yet she is wearing a pompom bracelet she made herself. Through the film, Ramirez shakes the pompom to up-tempo beat. Another video in contrast is very demure and subtle. Ramirez selected Nina Simone’s version of the classic song, I Put a Spell On You. Opting this time for a black and white scarf as her only adornment, Ramirez movements are clearly more somber and slow, yet passionate. The juxtaposition of the different films portray the different ways in which dance is used to express, explore, and understand human emotions.

In Dance Party!, Creativity Explored artists visually communicate their experiences and personal connections to all aspects of dance. Don’t miss a beat and be sure to see this exhibition of over 30 paintings, drawings, video, and installation art.
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