Bob Dylan's Birthday Tribute Event! The Dylan-Kerouac Connection

When
Event has passed (Fri May 18, 2018 - Fri May 18, 2018)
Where
The Art House Gallery & Cultural Center
Time
6:30 - 10PM
Cost
$15 - $25
Tags
Literary, Music

Description

MAY 18th Friday Night

ART HOUSE GALLERY & CULTURAL CENTER PRESENTS!!

A VERY SPECIAL BOB DYLAN’S BIRTHDAY TRIBUTE EVENT!

THE DYLAN-KEROUAC CONNECTION

SONGS POETRY and MUSIC!!!

former ROLLING STONE writer-editor

Michael Goldberg reads from his brilliant new essay ( in the new book Kerouac on Record )

REVEALING HOW Jack Kerouac (“ON THE ROAD”)

AND OTHER “BEAT” WRITERS (FERLINGHETTI, GINSBERG, ETC.)

INSPIRED AND INFLUENCED BOB DYLAN’S GREATEST SONGS

AND – SINGER-GUITARIST

To celebrate Bob Dylan’s birthday, a very special event, “The Dylan-Kerouac Connection,” will be held in Berkeley, CA on Friday, May 18, 2018.

Former Rolling Stone Senior Writer/ West Coast Music Editor Michael Goldberg and acclaimed Bay Area singer/guitarist Johnny Harper will be collaborating on a night of words about and music by Bob Dylan.

Goldberg will read from his new essay, “Bob Dylan’s Beat Visions (Sonic Poetry),” which has just been published in the book “Kerouac On Record” (Bloomsbury). Harper will perform exciting solo versions of “Desolation Row,” “Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues,” Mr. Tambourine Man,” “A Hard Rain’s a-Gonna Fall,” “Like a Rolling Stone” and more!

The two set evening will begin at 7:30 pm at The Art House Gallery & Cultural Center, 2905 Shattuck Avenue, Berkeley, CA. Doors open at 6:30 pm.

Goldberg’s essay focuses on how Jack Kerouac and other Beat writers had a profound influence on the songwriting of Bob Dylan. In reviewing “Kerouac On Record,” Mojo magazine wrote: “Among the strongest in a strong lot are Michael Goldberg’s examination of Dylan’s lit roots and Kerouac’s own musicological piece — ‘The Beginning Of Bop’ – that attempts to capture jazz in words – and succeeds.”

Johnny Harper is a well-known Bay Area singer, lead guitarist, songwriter, bandleader, arranger, and producer of recordings and concerts.

Harper has been known, for many years, for leading rockin’ bands (Johnny Harper & Carnival and the earlier Hot Links) specializing in the joyous, upbeat, and funky New Orleans R&B sound – the music of artists like Allen Toussaint, Dr. John, the Meters/ Neville Brothers, Professor Longhair, Fats Domino, and many more. He lived in New Orleans for several years at one point, soaking up the Crescent City’s magic first-hand.

In addition to his work in bands, Johnny is a powerful solo performer, accompanying himself in complex lead/rhythm and finger-picking styles on electric and acoustic guitars. He is a veteran performer in a wider range of American roots music styles – blues and gospel, vintage rock and classic country, R&B/ soul, traditional and contemporary folk, and more. He is an expert on the music of The Band, and knows over 100 Bob Dylan songs! And he is a born storyteller whose comments on the music are by turns moving and highly entertaining.

The show will take place at: The Art House Gallery & Cultural Center, 2905 Shattuck Avenue, Berkeley, CA. Suggested donation: $15.00 – $25.00

Johnny Harper

PLAYS EXCITING SOLO VERSIONS OF THOSE SONGS - LIVE!

“Desolation Row,” “Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues,” “Mr. Tambourine Man,”

“A Hard Rain’s a-Gonna Fall,” “It’s Alright Ma,” “Like a Rolling Stone” – and more!

FRI. MAY 18, 2018 7:30 PM

Art House Gallery & Cultural Center

2905 SHATTUCK AVE. (just north of Ashby) · Berkeley · (510) 472-3170

DOORS OPEN 6:30 PM • SHOW STARTS 7:30

THIS IS AN ALL-AGES SHOW

YOU ARE WELCOME TO BRING FOOD & BEVERAGES

Donation $15-$25

_______________________________________
Michael Goldberg’s essay “Bob Dylan’s Beat Visions (Sonic Poetry)” appears in the very interesting new book Kerouac on Record, edited by Simon Warner & Jim Sampas, and issued last month in hardcover by Bloomsbury Publishing. The various chapters and authors explore connections between Kerouac’s work and music. Some deal with important musicians who were inspired and influenced by Kerouac – Van Morrison, Tom Waits, Patti Smith, the Grateful Dead, Jim Morrison, Bruce Springsteen, and more. Others explore the ways in which great jazz musicians of the ’40s and ’50s inspired Kerouac’s writing. And there are chapters offering perspectives on Neal Cassady (who appears under various names as a major character in Kerouac’s novels), on the 1960 film of Kerouac’s The Subterranean s, and other topics of interest.

Michael Goldberg has written extensively on Dylan for many years. (Numerous pieces on Bob can be found in the archives of his web site Days of the Crazy-Wild.) His 11,000-word Dylan-Kerouac essay is meticulously researched, drawing on numerous Dylan biographies and interviews from across the span of his career. He also draws on a deep knowledge of Kerouac’s life and writing, and on the words of other important “Beat Generation” writers who influenced and interacted with Bob – Allen Ginsberg, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Michael McClure – and of Dylan cronies like Dave Van Ronk, Tom Paxton, and Mike Bloomfield.



And… in writing this essay, he did important new interviews with important figures who can shed light on both Bob and Jack: Lawrence Ferlinghetti (still going strong at age 99!); longtime Dylan sidekick Bob Neuwirth; filmmaker D.A. Pennebaker who documented Dylan’s ’60s performances in Don’t Look Back, Eat the Document, and No Direction Home; John Cohen (filmmaker, photographer, writer, New Lost City Ramblers member, and friend of both Jack and Bob); and musician-composer David Amram who also knew both men. All these witnesses add valuable fresh insights and some great stories.

Dylan himself has made no secret of his admiration for the “Beat” writers. As he recounts in Chronicles and in numerous interviews, he had read Kerouac’s novels and poems before he left Minneapolis in 1960, was mesmerized by On the Road, and plunged whole-heartedly into the Beat scene as soon as he arrived in New York. His growing poetic sensibility in those early years was also shaped by the French Symbolist poets like Rimbaud and Verlaine – who, in turn, had been a major influence on the Beats. These influences became more and more central to him as he evolved from the early Woody Guthrie-inspired classics that first made his name (“Blowin’ in the Wind,” “The Times They Are A-Changin’,” “With God on Our Side”) into more adventurous and overtly “poetic” masterpieces like “Mr. Tambourine Man,” “It’s Alright Ma (I’m Only Bleeding),” “Desolation Row,” and of course his breakthrough hit “Like A Rolling Stone.”

Location

location
  1. The Art House Gallery & Cultural Center 2905 Shattuck Avenue, Berkeley, CA