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Get Him to the Greek

Semi-Sequel is Semi-Funny

Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars.

Russell Brandís decadent rock star Aldous Snow proved popular enough in Forgetting Sarah Marshall that director Nicholas Stoller decided to make an entire film dedicated to him. Unfortunately, what made Jason Segelís film such a success wasnít solely Brandís character.

Get Him to the Greek sloppily copies Marshall with Jonah Hill in the title role as a record label intern acting as a babysitter for Snow. While there are definite laughs, it lacks the heart and soul itís predecessor had in spades.

Jonah Hill plays Aaron Green an up and coming record label intern hoping to find his big break in the industry. His opportunity comes in the shape of staging a 10-year anniversary concert of Aldous Snow at L.A.ís Greek Theatre. The only problem is that Snow has since become an industry joke and failure. Coupled with his detachment from the ďrealĒ world and all around rock star debauchery, Aaron is in charge of getting him from London to L.A. for the show.

What should be a simple task is obviously not so with Snow, and soon the film takes on the form of a raucous road trip. Not only does Aaron need to stay in control and get Aldous to stay on track, but heís also dealing with the recent breakup of his live-in girlfriend Daphne (Elizabeth Moss).

Like any good road trip film there are plenty of crazy scenes with Aaron immediately drawn into Aldousí seldom-sober lifestyle and pocket-dialing Daphne while hitting on fame-seeking groupies. No road trip with a rock star would be complete with out an outlandish Las Vegas stop with a great cameo of Judd Apatow (who produced this and Forgetting Sarah Marshall) regular Carla Gallo as an inept stripper lusting after Aaron.

The film is enlightened by other great cameos like Aziz Ansari as Aaronís ridiculous co-worker, and Rose Byrne as Jackie Q, Aldousí ex and a famous singer with hits about backdoor sex. P. Diddy takes the cake as Aaronís humorless boss, and record label owner, Sergio Roma.

Sure, Get Him to the Greek has enough laughs to warrant a viewing or two, but its story just isnít interesting or original enough to launch it into Forgetting Sarah Marshall territory. Whereas Forgetting Sarah Marshall used comedy to chronicle one manís struggle with heartbreak, Get him to the Greek uses a screenplay as a template that leads Jonah Hill and Russell Brand into crazy situations.

Like any spin-off, itís just a pale comparison of itís original. Fortunately, Hill and Brand offer enough humor to make it a good second-class comedy.