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Shopping Relief

Retailers Donate to Japan

In addition to make a direct donation, there are many ways to contribute to the relief effort for victims of the recent earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Many retailers in the Bay Area are making contributions with special products and sales.

San Francisco-based beauty brand Tatcha is donating profits from sales of its Aburatorigami kiri gift sets to Save the Children’s Japan Earthquake Tsunami Children in Emergency Fund. Each gift set consists of 15 packs of 30 Japanese blotting papers (gold-flecked aburatorigami, a “300-year-old Japanese beauty secret for a petal fresh complexion”). The fragrance-free, all-natural, biodegradable blotting papers are packaged in a custom-made keepsake box made by an artisan shop in the Asakusa district of Tokyo that has been creating such boxes since the 1800s.

Oakland-based Koide Studio is donating 50 percent of proceeds from many of the items in its Etsy store to the Northern Japan Earthquake Relief Fund. The handmade ceramic cups, plates and bowls are microwave-, dishwasher- and food-safe unless otherwise noted, and some are made by the proprietor’s mother in Japan. Also included are various adorable dioramas.

Artists Help Japan will hold its first local event Rise Japan on April 2nd at Gallery Heist and Kokoro Studio — both are located on Geary Boulevard — with work from SF artists selling for $100 a piece. All proceeds will be donated to Give2Asia’s Artists Help Japan Earthquake & Tsunami Fund, founded by Dice Tsutsumi, an art director at Pixar. Artists featured include Jeremy Fish, Ferris Plock, Kelly Tunstall, Ryan McGiness and many more.

Stüssy has teamed up with Japanese designer Hiroshi Fujiwara and his imprint, Fragment Design, to release the special edition One World One Heart T-shirt ($36, available in black or white), all profits going to the Japanese Red Cross. Look for the shirt at the company’s Haight Street store.

In a truly unique fashion, Fatlace is rewarding donors with special edition wood “Pray for Japan” yoyos in collaboration with YoYoFactory. All donations go to the Japanese Red Cross, with a minimum of $10 to get the yo-yo (you’ll get one of five colors). Visit Fatlace HQ on Post Street in Japantown.

Drop off clothing and other donations at Theory on Maiden Lane, or at any Theory store around the company. Theory is a company under Japan-based Fast Retailing, whose mainstay Uniqlo has contributed $17 million in cash ($12 million of which came from CEO Tadashi Yanai’s own pocket) and $8.6 million in clothing.