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Literary Arts Articles
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Literary Arts
By SFS Staff (Nov 20, 2004)
Jim Cooke, who has been the host of the Second Sundays Seven Seventeen PM Story-hour for the past 14 years, has a story to tell about how SSSSSH got started if you ask him. More
Literary Arts
By Sophia Hanifah (Nov 20, 2004)
The Poetry Flash bimonthly review & literacy calendar has staged their weekly reading series at Cody's Books in Berkeley since the early 80s. Held every Wednesday for many years, Poetry at Cody's recently moved to Sunday evenings. Hosts Richard Silberg and Joyce Jenkins (Associate Editor and Editor/Publisher respectively) usually arrange 2 readers per night, giving each poet ample time to cover a range of their work. More
Literary Arts
By Sophia Hanifah (Nov 20, 2004)
Mike Fleming, AKA Open Mike, started Wednesday's night events at the Canvas Café in early 2003, after the weekly events at Nickie's and Dogs Bollix drew to a close. Wednesdays are a mixed bag, where all types of performance art are welcome, including live music, poetry and spoken word, and sometimes dance. Mike actively books feature artists, who usually perform a 30-minute set of music at 9 PM, in the midst of a wide variety of undiscovered talent, who sign up for 10-minute sets all night. More
Literary Arts
By Sophia Hanifah (Nov 20, 2004)
Open mics here are not as relile as they werep until June 2003, when the once faithful regular host decided to call it quits. Up until then, the ample stage (in a separate room from the bar) accommodated various word-smiths, bards, and balladeers, entertaining many a local -- whether Outer-Mission barflies or artist types. More
Literary Arts
Foreign and Local Poets Read Original Work at S.F. Festival
By Alex Lash (Nov 20, 2004)
Under the auspices of the Poetry Center, Dickison and his staff have organized three gatherings of Other Words, formerly known as the Euro-San Francisco Poetry Festival, since 1999. Edition No. 3 starts Thursday, September 25 and brings together 17 poets from around the world -- Russia, Ireland, Italy, France, Finland, Germany, Sweden, Greece, Mexico and the U.S. -- to read onstage in their native tongues with accompanying English translation when necessary. More
Literary Arts
Larger-than-life Pulitzer winner enthralls
By rebecca fox (Nov 20, 2004)
Michael Chabon's "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay" is written with a dexterity and sleight of hand indigenous to the superheroes, artists and magicians who inhabit his novel. With elements of fantasy and history and an epic sweep - the story spans three continents in as many decades - "Kavalier and Clay" depicts the bond between cousins Josef Kavalier and Samuel Klayman in pre-World War II New York. More
Literary Arts
By SFS Staff (Nov 20, 2004)
When reading this well written - albeit self-serving - polemic, one simply cannot refrain from thinking up additional subtitles: "What else can you expect from pigs but grunts?" "How an idealistic Harvard Law School Professor and defender of O.J. Simpson found out there's no Santa Claus and no Easter Bunny on the same day." "Liberal lawyer with great credentials desires post as U.S. Supreme Court Justice (when Democrats return to the White House)." More
Literary Arts
Restaurant Tell-All Exposes the Dirty Truth
By lisa ryers (Nov 20, 2004)
Anyone who had the opportunity to read Bourdain's kitchen exposé in The New Yorker last year will recall how this executive chef from Manhattan's Brasserie Les Halles disenchanted our dining fantasy with a kitchen reality: that bread on your table was recycled from a previous table. Any fish you order on Monday has been sitting there since Friday. But Bourdain is no Upton Sinclair - he writes not to reform the industry, only to let you know what the real deal is. He wanted to write a book that "my fellow cooks would find entertaining and true." His book is a self-described memoir/rant. More
Literary Arts
Apples and Tulips and Marijuana, Oh My!
By lisa ryers (Nov 20, 2004)
With a name like Michael Pollan (say it, don't spell it), this author's cred as a garden writer should not be challenged. His previous book, Second Nature, chronicled the perils and pleasures of the home garden. Now, the New York Times Sunday Magazine writer investigates humanity's dependence on four particular plants: the apple (representing our desire for sweetness); the tulip (beauty); marijuana (intoxication) and the potato (control). Pollan focuses on these particular strains because he feels "they have great stories to tell." More
Literary Arts
Barbara Ehrenreich's Nickel and Dimed
By rebecca fox (Nov 20, 2004)
According to essayist and social critic Barbara Ehrenreich, you never saw her. She could have served your salad in Florida, or possibly pushed a mop at your home in Maine, or even folded your Faded Glory jeans at a Minnesota Wal-Mart. Ehrenreich assumed all these low-wage jobs and more in a year she devoted to discovering whether the life of the working poor worked at all. Armed with her automobile, first month's rent and a commitment to divorce herself from any perks afforded by her former life as a journalist, Ehrenreich set out to see how the other half lived. More
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