Kinky

When
Sat Feb 21, 2009
Where
The Regency Ballroom
Time
8:00pm
Cost
$25 - $27
Tags
Clubs, Dance Clubs, Music, Rock, World Music, Pop
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Description

"One of those bands that's tough to write about because they defy the sort of categorizations writers like to tag music with, Kinky specializes in a sort of Latino funk that draws from rock as well as electronica, not to mention the wealth of rhythms Latin music offers. The five-piece band from Monterrey, Mexico, caused quite a stir among music industry insiders and critics with their self-titled debut in 2002. Produced by renowned Brit Chris Allison and released on his Sonic360 label, the album was part funk-rock fusion, part Latin alternative, and part electronica -- which led to all-encompassing hybrid tags along the lines of "rocktronica en espaol." But unlike music industry insiders and critics, good ol' music lovers didn't need a tag -- they just enjoyed the music, whatever its style. And indeed, Kinky inspired a quick and large following, playing an abundance of live shows that would quickly evolve into manic dance parties.

Kinky first came together as a trio in 2000, at first including vocalist/guitarist Gilberto Cerezo, keyboardist/programmer Ulises Lozano, and guitarist Carlos Chairez, and resultingly toyed with rocktronica experimentation. Drummer Omar Gongora and bassist Cesar Pliego joined shortly thereafter, giving the band more of a "band" essence, and by summer 2000, the guys were prepared to perform at the Battle of Bands hosted by the annual Latin Alternative Music Conference (LAMC) in New York City. Battle they did, and when it was all said and done, Kinky emerged champion and began entertaining record deals. In particular, Chris Allison liked what he heard and offered to produce the group as well as release their debut album on his Sonic360 label. The British producer already had a solid track record -- Coldplay, the Beta Band, Fila Brazillia, Dot Allison, the Wedding Present, Ned's Atomic Dustbin, and more -- and so the band went with him with high hopes.

The resulting self-titled debut, Kinky, was released in early 2002 and was quite hyped. It didn't set the world afire, but it did meet substantial acclaim, especially from critics (armchair and otherwise), and with a little time word of mouth brought about a sizable following (helped in part by the use of one of the band's songs in a hip Nissan Altima car commercial), one which flocked to the band's barnburning live performances. These live performances were not only barnburning but also curious because much of Kinky was electronic in nature. Though the band didn't strictly program beats la the Chemical Brothers or Daft Punk, there were a lot of beats and electronics showcased throughout the album, largely the result of the band sampling themselves and looping those samples in a beat-like fashion.

Such artistry was a bit difficult to replicate on-stage, and so when Kinky returned to the studio to record their follow-up album, they cut back on the electronics. That follow-up album, Atlas, released in late 2003, was quite anticipated and was indeed less electronic in nature. It was still a fusion of Latin, funk, rock, and electronica, however, and though not quite as earth-shaking as the band's debut, Atlas still pleased a great many listeners and kept the Kinky bandwagon trucking along just fine. They decided to stick with that formula for their next album, Reina, which was recorded in a cabin in the mountains of Southern California -- complete with mudslides -- and featured guest performances from Men at Work's Colin Hay and Intocable accordionist Ricardo Muoz." ~ Jason Birchmeier, All Music Guide

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Location

  1. The Regency Ballroom
    1290 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA