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D.E.B.S.

Don't Even Bother Seeing It

As a male, I clearly fit the target audience for D.E.B.S. The cast consists of five tempting women, four of whom play anti-terrorist coeds compulsively clad in blue and white plaid mini-skirts. The other, Jordana Brewster (The Fast and the Furious) playing über-terrorist Lucy Diamond, opts for a body-hugging black suit. Add to this mix a lesbian romance and we have a storyline that could easily have been lifted from the diary of Larry Flynt.

Deep down though, D.E.B.S. is a satire poking fun at the objectification of women in mainstream fair, the preposterous nature of the average action film and several other clichés about the smelly products of Hollywood labor. Unfortunately, this is ground that has already been covered on numerous occasions. In fact, there's virtually nothing about D.E.B.S. that is any more original than the films it strives to ridicule. Failed spoofs often fall into the trap of believing that "campiness" is an acceptable substitute for genuine substance. That, somehow, if what they poke fun at can just be exaggerated to the point of sheer absurdity, it magically transmogrifies into actual humor. It does not.

This isn't to say the film never elicits a light chuckle. Thankfully, Scud, Lucy Diamond's assistant in evil, provides an occasional laugh while commenting on the silliness of the various events that comprise the movie's plot line. Plus, while everything in this film feels recycled, Catholic school girls traipsing about is a concept that simply never loses its luster -- at least for the half of the population that I belong to.

Rating: 1.5 out of 5 stars